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AAA  Jan. 13, 2018 2:46 PM ET
The Latest: Hawaii governor says mistake can't happen again
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(AP) — The Latest on a missile threat mistakenly sent by Hawaii officials (all times local):

9:45 a.m.

Hawaii Gov. David Ige (IG'-eh) says he's meeting with officials this morning to find out what happened after an alert was mistakenly sent to residents saying a ballistic missile was inbound for Hawaii.

The missile threat was a false alarm.

Ige says he's meeting with the state defense and emergency management officials to not only find out how this could occur, but to make sure it doesn't happen again.

Ige says, "The public must have confidence in our emergency alert system."

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9:15 a.m.

Hawaii Sen. Brian Schatz says a false alarm about a missile threat was based on "human error" and was "totally inexcusable."

Schatz went on his Twitter account after emergency management officials confirmed the push alert about an incoming missile Saturday was a mistake, calling for accountability and an alert process that is foolproof.

The alert stated there was a threat "inbound to Hawaii" and for residents to seek shelter and that "this is not a drill."

The morning alert caused residents to panic.

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency says it's not clear what caused the alert to go out.

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8:35 a.m.

Hawaii emergency officials say an alert of a ballistic missile threat is a false alarm.

The alert stated there was a threat "inbound to Hawaii" and for residents to seek shelter and that "this is not a drill."

The alert caused a panic when it went to people's cellphones Saturday morning but, shortly after, authorities said it was a mistake.

Hawaii Emergency Management Agency spokesman Richard Rapoza says it's not clear what caused the alert to go out.

Associated Press
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